Pair of paintings from Dutch golden age reunited after 351 years

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Two young women glance up from their keyboards again this week, re-united at the Dulwich Picture Gallery after 351 years apart.

Both paintings are the work of the Dutch 17th-century painter Gerrit Dou, regarded as one of the marvels of his age. He was a pupil of Rembrandt’s, and considered by some of their contemporaries as the greater artist.

He worked so slowly, known to take a week to paint a single hand, that it was an event when he actually finished any painting, still less two together. The two pictures were shown together at the home of his wealthy patron Johannes Hannot in Leiden in 1665, said to be the first solo exhibition by a living artist.

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Source: Pair of paintings from Dutch golden age reunited after 351 years | Art and design | The Guardian

William Merritt Chase, The Man Who Taught America’s Artistic Masters


On display are his portraits, landscapes, domestic scenes, and still life paintings. Chase made everyday objects — like onions and fish — gorgeous. The dead, silver fish spread out on platters look as if they could leap off the plate in a second. Chase often painted fish during class demonstrations at his New York School of Art, says curator Katherine Bourguignon of the Terra Foundation for American Art.

“The students write about this: He went to the fish market, bought the fish, he painted it, and returned the fish before it went bad,” she explains says.

“You walk around these galleries and the paintings are gutsy and bold and scintillating and brilliant,” says Dorothy Kosinski, director of the Phillips.

On display are his portraits, landscapes, domestic scenes, and still life paintings. Chase made everyday objects — like onions and fish — gorgeous. The dead, silver fish spread out on platters look as if they could leap off the plate in a second. Chase often painted fish during class demonstrations at his New York School of Art, says curator Katherine Bourguignon of the Terra Foundation for American Art.

“The students write about this: He went to the fish market, bought the fish, he painted it, and returned the fish before it went bad,” she explains says.

That’s how fast he was! Loaded with charisma, confidence and brushes thickly caked with paint, his strokes were sure and stunning.

Source: Meet William Merritt Chase, The Man Who Taught America’s Artistic Masters : NPR

A painter enchanting the art world with her thoroughly modern muse

You don’t need to paint Kirsty any more, people told me, now you have won with this painting,” laughed artist Clara Drummond this weekend following her receipt last week of the prestigious BP portrait award, “but that’s not how it is. I will carry on. I plan to paint her soon, full length, in the landscape; something monumental.”

Girl in a Liberty Dress, Drummond’s prize-winning work, is a study of her fellow artist Kirsty Buchanan, and means much more to them both than a bid to net a £30,000 prize purse. It is the latest product of a fruitful friendship that plays with the conventions of portraiture, as well as quietly reshaping ideas about the nature of an artist’s muse.

It was the third painting of Buchanan by Drummond to contend for the prize in recent years, and came from intense discussions between the pair about the purpose and practice of their art. “We were standing together in total disbelief on the night I won. But it was the alchemy of our conversations that had lead to the work,” said Drummond.

Occasionally the 38-year-old artist from Highbury, north London, will ask a stranger to sit for her, and in the past she has painted her friend the actor Ben Whishaw, but Buchanan is still her favoured subject.

Source: The painter enchanting the art world with her thoroughly modern muse | Art and design | The Guardian

Art Basel 47th Edition opens to a long line of umbrella-wielding VIPs

Despite the steady rain and premonitions of a faltering art market, the 47th edition of Art Basel, Europe’s premier modern and contemporary art fair, opened to a long line of umbrella-wielding VIPs who quickly scooped up a broad range of offerings.

At Paris-based Chantal Crousel, a new diptych by Wade Guyton, “Untitled,” in Epson Ultra-Chrome K-3 Inkjet on linen and measuring 128 by 108 ¼ inches, sold in the opening moments of the preview for $600,000 to a French collector. The image, inspired by Guyton’s 2001 “Altered Steel Chair” sculpture, which he deconstructed from a found Marcel Breuer “Cesca Chair” from 1928, depicts the stripped-down and largely unrecognizable skeletal frame set against a grainy abstract background. As at last year’s fair, Guyton parceled out iterations of the identical image to four other galleries that represent him in various parts of the world.

 Next door, the L.A./New York gallery Blum & Poe sold Julian Schnabel’s large 1990 abstraction “Painting Without Bingo II,” in oil on distressed army tarpaulin, for around $350,000 to a European collector. “He has such a deep collector base in Europe, we sold it in the first minute,” said founding co-partner Jeff Poe. “Schnabel’s influence is insane and needs to be brought to the forefront.” Massimo De Carlo, of London, Milan, and Hong Kong, sold a primary market, previously unexhibited Rudolf Stingel patterned abstraction from 2014 for somewhere around the $1.8 million asking price, also to a European collector.

Source: Sales Report: Art Basel 47 Gives No Cause for Concern

Adoration of the Shepherds painting ‘wrecked beyond repair’ to be shown again after intensive restoration

A painting that languished in store for several lifetimes, regarded as too wrecked ever to be exhibited again at the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge, has been restored through thousands of hours of work by expert conservators. It will now go on display to mark the museum’s bicentenary.

A glowing landscape framing a tender scene of the Adoration of the Shepherds, by the Italian Renaissance master Sebastiano del Piombo, has re-emerged from three centuries of overpainting, attempts to solve the original disastrous decision to lift it off the 16th century wooden panel and transfer it to canvas.

“Every now and then our people would take a look at it and walk away again, sadly shaking their heads,” said Rupert Featherstone, director of the Hamilton Kerr Institute, a world leader in conservation research and techniques.

Addoration of the Shepards

Source: Painting ‘wrecked beyond repair’ to be shown again after intensive restoration | Art and design | The Guardian

Friends raise funds to honour ‘painter’s painter’

Popoff died in March 2015 at age 65 as a result of multiple myeloma, a cancer that starts in plasma cells.

A memorial fund for the late artist aims to donate one of Popoff’s pieces to the University of Saskatchewan’s permanent collection. In addition to completing her BFA, MFA and MEd at the institution, she also went on to be a sessional lecturer and instructor there.

Anne McElroy, one of the fund’s creators and a fellow artist, said Popoff was a true painter.

“She wasn’t a Sunday painter. She wasn’t a painter who painted for other people. She painted because she couldn’t help herself. She was what they call a painter’s painter,” she said.

Popoff’s paintings often used imagery from her garden and home, but added her own whimsical, abstract style. McElroy admired Popoff’s work, which featured a “lovely sense of colour”.

Source: Friends raise funds to honour ‘painter’s painter’ | Saskatoon StarPhoenix

You Gonna Finish That? What We Can Learn From Artworks In Progress


The Unfinished show has an intriguing subtitle: “Thoughts Left Visible.” The exhibit showcases works made over some 600 years, which offer glimpses into the creative process and sometimes reveal artists’ anger or despair.

Curator Andrea Bayer says that unfinished works can still be masterpieces. She cites a small, exquisitely detailed drawing Jan van Eyck made in 1437, in preparation for a painted panel.

Saint Barbara sits on a hill near a looming Gothic tower. She holds a thick book and long, graceful palm leaves. The young woman is drawn in black, on a pale background. Van Eyck paints in just a few birds against a blue sky. “And then he stopped,” says Bayer, and declares, “It’s a masterpiece.” No one knows why van Eyck didn’t apply paint to the rest of the panel. But he signed and dated it, which usually means an artist thinks it’s finished.

Rembrandt was once asked why so many of his works look half-finished. He replied: “A work of art is complete when in it the artist has realized his intention.” Rembrandt implies that it’s up to the artist to decide, not to critics, who may say a work appears raw, lacking a complete appearance.

Paul Cezanne, who was never satisfied, rarely signed his works. In a letter to his mother, he wrote that finishing things was a goal for imbeciles.

Source: You Gonna Finish That? What We Can Learn From Artworks In Progress : NPR

Emerson Medical at Sudbury continues Art Exhibition series


Emerson Medical at Sudbury, 490 Boston Post Road, will continuing its Art Exhibit series with paintings by local artists Emily Passman, of Lexington, and Tom Veirs, of Carlisle.

The exhibit will be on display on multiple levels of Emerson’s medical office building through from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays until the end of August.

Passman is a painter of oils and acrylics, known for her expressive, loose style. She works from observation, both in the studio and “plein air” and describes her work as a ‘reaction to’ the observation of a subject, with a loaded brush, as opposed to a rendering of a “pretty” scene. Her work is in galleries in New England and in private collections internationally. After earning both a fine arts degree and a Master’s in education, she had a successful career as an educator and graphic designer before she became a painter.

Born in Memphis, Tennessee, Veirs is primarily a self-taught painter. He studied stage performance at Memphis State University and enlisted in the U.S. Army where he was assigned to a military police unit in Germany. His inspiration for artistic expression, whether it involves painting, stage performance, music or any other artistic work, lies in the emotion of the moment both from a performer’s experience as well as an observer.

Source: Emerson Medical at Sudbury continues Art Exhibition series – News – The Sudbury Town Crier – Sudbury, MA

You Don’t Need to Be in New York to Make It as an Artist


Zachary Armstrong’s work is laden with symbolic nostalgia. The self-taught artist’s canvases on view at the Tilton Gallery on Manhattan’s Upper East Side are also reminiscent of the work of Jean Dubuffet and the outsider artists he once championed.

Armstrong is in fact somewhat of an outsider, choosing to live and work out of a studio in his hometown of Dayton, Ohio. The influence of the blue-collar city permeates his work. Compared to market darlings such as Jeff Koons, who rely on dozens of assistants, the 31-year-old artist builds all of his canvases and stretchers himself, and is known for spending marathon 16-hour sessions in the studio.

While the themes of youth and childhood occupy most of the artist’s output, stylistically he is far less consistent, dabbling in myriad painting styles and mediums. On one hand, he creates cartoonish dinosaur paintings reminiscent of children’s room wallpaper and stick figure canvases inspired by his childhood scribbles, and on the other side of the spectrum there are his vertiginous canvas stacks.

Inside his solo show at the Tilton Gallery, a childhood portrait of the artist drawn by his older brother hangs adjacent to the entrance. The picture is a recurring image throughout the show. The image is superimposed multiple times in the artist’s encaustic covered canvases. We walked through the exhibition with the artist who spoke about his hometown, his influences, and his studio practice.

Source: Zachary Armstrong on Freedom of Painting – artnet News

Disney Art Legend: Eyvind Earle Exhibit


Many movie buffs can easily recall specific sights and locations from animated Disney classics, places they can describe down to the teeniest, most florid detail.

The chandeliered library from Beast’s castle is a place entrenched in many a fan’s memory, and the grotto where Ariel keeps all of her underwater thingamabobs is easily summoned to mind.

But the look of a Disney film goes beyond the places that pop up along the way. It’s in the lines and colors and shadows and overarching style, too, all elements that weave into the larger story mythos.

Artist Eyvind Earle was a mid-century master of the form, as evidenced by his iconic background paintings for 1959’s “Sleeping Beauty.” Often cited as some of the most striking backgrounds in all of animation, Mr. Earle’s densely drawn woods were lushly medieval, yes, but they also boasted a touch mid-century panache.

Source: Disney Art Legend: Eyvind Earle Exhibit