Tori Patterson’s art examines identity formation


Her work will be on display at the main campus gallery through Sept. 22. The gallery is located on the first floor of the Arts Building, 3536 Butte Campus Drive.

For the show, Patterson was inspired by identity formation, loss and rebirth—the path in which humans become who they are.

There are 21 paintings in a varied mix of her work interpreting the subdued, flourishing, or sometimes messy angles of the self at a given time.

Defining the self does not mean these are clear-cut portraits. Instead, they range from abstractions and landscape to figure studies.

The paintings are colorful yet subdued, with expressive strokes, colors and twisted lines that unhinge a realistic interpretation. These are a study on affect and identity, where introspection, dreaming and confronting a more difficult narrative are embraced.

Patterson is a painter who works and lives in the New York City

 

Source: http://www.chicoer.com/article/NA/20160820/FEATURES/160829984

Businessman became Artist by Painting with his Phablet

A well-known art collector and wealthy Mumbai businessman was standing in his orchid gardens in Alibag when he was struck by a desire to paint the flowers for his celebrity-chef wife.

Taking out a stylus and his Galaxy Note, Dilip De got to work. It took him a while to understand how to work the stylus and he accidentally deleted several paintings before eventually completing his first ever piece of art. Spurred by this experience, De began to paint on with his device voraciously.

Clearly influenced by Picasso, De explains that he studied art both when he was younger and as an art collector, and he has applied his knowledge of art history to his new passion, invoking themes of abstract surrealism and figurative art.


Introducing his work, De excitedly explains that his phablet-based art allows him to create whenever and wherever, making art “omnipresent.” On August 17th, De’s 24 paintings were shown in an exhibition called Celebration of Love at Jehangir Art Gallery.

Full article at source: How A Wealthy Businessman Became an Artist By Painting with his Phablet | The Creators Project

Did Alec Baldwin Pay $190,000 for the Wrong Picture?

Ten years or so ago, as the actor Alec Baldwin remembers it, the gallery owner Mary Boone sent him an invitation to a show of work by the painter Ross Bleckner, an artist whom she represented and he had befriended.The card featured a reproduction of Mr. Bleckner’s “Sea and Mirror,” a work from 1996, when the artist was at the height of his popularity.So began Mr. Baldwin’s love affair with the painting — an infatuation that has ended with Mr. Baldwin, who occupies a central role in New York’s cultural life, now pitted in a bitter dispute with two formidable players in the city’s rarefied world of art and money — Ms. Boone, a prominent art dealer, and Mr. Bleckner, one of her notable talents.This has, to say the least, become awkward.

Source: Paint and Switch? Did Alec Baldwin Pay $190,000 for the Wrong Picture? – The New York Times

Why Peter Doig must go to court to prove this painting isn’t his


What happens when a famous living artist is not allowed to authenticate his own work?

Retired correctional officer Robert Fletcher says he bought a painting from Peter Doig in 1975 — long before the now-famous artist was raking in millions for his work.

The only problem? Doig insists he had nothing to do with the painting.

Now the artist is being sued by the alleged patron, who insists he bought the painting — a stark desert scene — from Doig himself, decades ago in Thunder Bay.

The two are facing off in a bizarre trial unfolding in Chicago this week.

Today guest host Jelena Adzic explores the layers of this strange story with fine arts observer Hrag Vartanian. The case raises big questions about art, authenticity and who to believe in this battle over brushstrokes.

Source: Why Peter Doig must go to court to prove this painting isn’t his

Artist Explores Human Nature in Series of Nude Paintings


About five years ago, Cambodian artist Heng Ravuth embarked on a journey—exploring human nature through the naked body.

For his latest exhibition, “Drunk Nude,” which opens Wednesday at Phnom Penh’s Java Cafe & Gallery, the 31-year-old painter has depicted the male body, distorted in different settings, reflecting the nature of people devoid of their trappings.

Each work is the result of a long process, during which he first amplified and altered photographs of himself with editing software and then transformed the resulting images using pencil and paint. The outcome is a series of multilayered acrylic paintings in which the superimposed visual elements create a collage-like impression.

“This gives me the freedom to create my own distorted reality… reflected as twisted and offbeat,” he said.

In “Naked With Dog,” a nude, tattooed man sits on a dilapidated armchair. He has a two-sided head, each side with a mouth and nose, as if attempting to keep watch over all corners of his world.

Source: Artist Explores Human Nature in Series of Nude Paintings – The Cambodia Daily

Pair of paintings from Dutch golden age reunited after 351 years

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Two young women glance up from their keyboards again this week, re-united at the Dulwich Picture Gallery after 351 years apart.

Both paintings are the work of the Dutch 17th-century painter Gerrit Dou, regarded as one of the marvels of his age. He was a pupil of Rembrandt’s, and considered by some of their contemporaries as the greater artist.

He worked so slowly, known to take a week to paint a single hand, that it was an event when he actually finished any painting, still less two together. The two pictures were shown together at the home of his wealthy patron Johannes Hannot in Leiden in 1665, said to be the first solo exhibition by a living artist.

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Source: Pair of paintings from Dutch golden age reunited after 351 years | Art and design | The Guardian

William Merritt Chase, The Man Who Taught America’s Artistic Masters


On display are his portraits, landscapes, domestic scenes, and still life paintings. Chase made everyday objects — like onions and fish — gorgeous. The dead, silver fish spread out on platters look as if they could leap off the plate in a second. Chase often painted fish during class demonstrations at his New York School of Art, says curator Katherine Bourguignon of the Terra Foundation for American Art.

“The students write about this: He went to the fish market, bought the fish, he painted it, and returned the fish before it went bad,” she explains says.

“You walk around these galleries and the paintings are gutsy and bold and scintillating and brilliant,” says Dorothy Kosinski, director of the Phillips.

On display are his portraits, landscapes, domestic scenes, and still life paintings. Chase made everyday objects — like onions and fish — gorgeous. The dead, silver fish spread out on platters look as if they could leap off the plate in a second. Chase often painted fish during class demonstrations at his New York School of Art, says curator Katherine Bourguignon of the Terra Foundation for American Art.

“The students write about this: He went to the fish market, bought the fish, he painted it, and returned the fish before it went bad,” she explains says.

That’s how fast he was! Loaded with charisma, confidence and brushes thickly caked with paint, his strokes were sure and stunning.

Source: Meet William Merritt Chase, The Man Who Taught America’s Artistic Masters : NPR

A painter enchanting the art world with her thoroughly modern muse

You don’t need to paint Kirsty any more, people told me, now you have won with this painting,” laughed artist Clara Drummond this weekend following her receipt last week of the prestigious BP portrait award, “but that’s not how it is. I will carry on. I plan to paint her soon, full length, in the landscape; something monumental.”

Girl in a Liberty Dress, Drummond’s prize-winning work, is a study of her fellow artist Kirsty Buchanan, and means much more to them both than a bid to net a £30,000 prize purse. It is the latest product of a fruitful friendship that plays with the conventions of portraiture, as well as quietly reshaping ideas about the nature of an artist’s muse.

It was the third painting of Buchanan by Drummond to contend for the prize in recent years, and came from intense discussions between the pair about the purpose and practice of their art. “We were standing together in total disbelief on the night I won. But it was the alchemy of our conversations that had lead to the work,” said Drummond.

Occasionally the 38-year-old artist from Highbury, north London, will ask a stranger to sit for her, and in the past she has painted her friend the actor Ben Whishaw, but Buchanan is still her favoured subject.

Source: The painter enchanting the art world with her thoroughly modern muse | Art and design | The Guardian

Art Basel 47th Edition opens to a long line of umbrella-wielding VIPs

Despite the steady rain and premonitions of a faltering art market, the 47th edition of Art Basel, Europe’s premier modern and contemporary art fair, opened to a long line of umbrella-wielding VIPs who quickly scooped up a broad range of offerings.

At Paris-based Chantal Crousel, a new diptych by Wade Guyton, “Untitled,” in Epson Ultra-Chrome K-3 Inkjet on linen and measuring 128 by 108 ¼ inches, sold in the opening moments of the preview for $600,000 to a French collector. The image, inspired by Guyton’s 2001 “Altered Steel Chair” sculpture, which he deconstructed from a found Marcel Breuer “Cesca Chair” from 1928, depicts the stripped-down and largely unrecognizable skeletal frame set against a grainy abstract background. As at last year’s fair, Guyton parceled out iterations of the identical image to four other galleries that represent him in various parts of the world.

 Next door, the L.A./New York gallery Blum & Poe sold Julian Schnabel’s large 1990 abstraction “Painting Without Bingo II,” in oil on distressed army tarpaulin, for around $350,000 to a European collector. “He has such a deep collector base in Europe, we sold it in the first minute,” said founding co-partner Jeff Poe. “Schnabel’s influence is insane and needs to be brought to the forefront.” Massimo De Carlo, of London, Milan, and Hong Kong, sold a primary market, previously unexhibited Rudolf Stingel patterned abstraction from 2014 for somewhere around the $1.8 million asking price, also to a European collector.

Source: Sales Report: Art Basel 47 Gives No Cause for Concern

Adoration of the Shepherds painting ‘wrecked beyond repair’ to be shown again after intensive restoration

A painting that languished in store for several lifetimes, regarded as too wrecked ever to be exhibited again at the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge, has been restored through thousands of hours of work by expert conservators. It will now go on display to mark the museum’s bicentenary.

A glowing landscape framing a tender scene of the Adoration of the Shepherds, by the Italian Renaissance master Sebastiano del Piombo, has re-emerged from three centuries of overpainting, attempts to solve the original disastrous decision to lift it off the 16th century wooden panel and transfer it to canvas.

“Every now and then our people would take a look at it and walk away again, sadly shaking their heads,” said Rupert Featherstone, director of the Hamilton Kerr Institute, a world leader in conservation research and techniques.

Addoration of the Shepards

Source: Painting ‘wrecked beyond repair’ to be shown again after intensive restoration | Art and design | The Guardian