Frank Bowling: An exemplary artist for our time
Apr10

Frank Bowling: An exemplary artist for our time

It’s impossible to ignore the sheer scale of many of Frank Bowling’s paintings. Australia to Africa, for example, from 1971, is in excess of 7m wide. When you are face to face with it, it’s a Cinerama screen of a painting, a huge, warm, radiant, luxuriant, colour-saturated expanse, oceanic in feeling as well as in title. Yet Bowling never tries to overwhelm the viewer with scale, as some artists have done and continue to do. There’s an easy, enveloping generosity to his vision. He creates vast chromatic spaces not to impress us, but for us. Mappa Mundi, first seen at the Haus der Kunst in Munich, is a welcome retrospective survey of his work from the late-1960s. At its heart are several of the artist’s “map paintings”. He began to produce these in New York around 1967 and they featured in a landmark exhibition at the Whitney in 1971. The show’s other main strands are made up of series of works named after his father, Richard Sheridan, and his wife, textile artist Rachel Scott Bowling, and relating to his working and living environments, usually watery in nature: Great Thames, Bartica Flats, and Wintergreens.   Source : Irish...

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There’s a poetry in painting that gives endless possibilities
Mar21

There’s a poetry in painting that gives endless possibilities

It was always my dream to be an artist but I never expected to be a curator. Graduates considering vocations in critical and curatorial practice went to the Royal College of Art or studied art history at university. Not me: I trained at Chelsea College of Art and then went to the British School at Rome where I was the Abbey Scholar in Painting. In general I like to work with painters – there’s a poetry in painting that gives endless possibilities and painting is often about looking inward – searching the “space within”. Silent Painting is the sixth show I have curated, featuring three women artists at an exciting new space in King’s Cross, the Tripp Gallery. The idea for the exhibition came when I stumbled across a painting I had not seen since I was a student. I was wandering around the National Gallery when I spotted Rembrandt’s Self Portrait, 1669, made at the end of his life when he was 63 years old. It’s quite a sad painting – the darkness of the work reflects the old man’s mood as he contemplates his own demise and it seems he has nothing left to say. The painting I have selected for this show from my own work is The Perfect 50s Housewife, 2018 (main picture). It tells the story of the American housewife from a bygone era, who has bought a new fridge and stuffed it with food and drink. Her daughter stands there showing off her huge homemade cake whilst the mother mimes “Isn’t it big!”. The fashionable scenes displayed in my work are populated but focus on the non-communication or separation of each figure from the other, creating a void of silence. Source: The Art...

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The Cosmic Landscapes of Matthew Lee
Feb13

The Cosmic Landscapes of Matthew Lee

Matthew Lee is a phenomenal landscape painter, with the ability to absorb you into the world of his paintings. His work makes you want to spend time with it and ponder the message behind it. He grew up in Middleton, west of Madison, journeyed to Milwaukee when he was 18 years old, and never looked back. After receiving his bachelor’s degree in portrait painting from UW-Milwaukee, he went on a research adventure to Antarctica that would change his style and focus of painting, drawing from him the works that are currently wowing viewers of his Redline Milwaukee exhibition. When he is not showing his work in galleries Lee teaches art classes at MIAD and makes annual trips, with Carthage college, to Montana to excavate 65-million-year-old dinosaur remains. In all of his works you can see his appreciation for our earth and the amount of time and energy he has put into mastering the visual representation of it on canvas. I had the pleasure of sitting with Matt for an enlightening discussion. What is your favorite type of Art? I like early American Modernism, a lot. Peter Bloom, Edward Hopper, and those people. I always joke that my work is like Ed Hopper’s Antarctica, like if he had decided to get out of New England, if he had been to the Arctic and been around telescopes and painted like that.   Read full article at source:...

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If the West can appreciate India’s tribal art, why can’t Indians?
Jan25

If the West can appreciate India’s tribal art, why can’t Indians?

The paintings of iconic Indian artists such as MF Husain and VS Gaitonde may raise millions of dollars at global auctions, but there’s a whole world of tribal talent that remains largely unknown, even within India. To change this, an upcoming online platform is putting these unsung artists front and centre, highlighting the unique paintings of the Gonds from Madhya Pradesh and the Warli in Maharashtra, among others. Tribal Art Forms, a collaboration between the contemporary art galleries Exhibit320 and BluePrint12, aims to raise awareness about India’s diverse tribal art forms, and give its master artists the recognition they deserve. “…when you travel abroad, you realise a lot of this art is really appreciated abroad. They understand the value and that it’s not going to be here to stay for a very long time,” Rasika Kajaria, owner and chief operating officer of Exhibit320, told Quartz. “And in India the value is not understood. It seems to most that it’s here, it’s available, but the point is it’s not anymore, and the number of people making it is reducing every single day.” For decades, India’s tribal communities have been creating unique paintings, featuring animal figures and nature-based themes, which document their distinct cultures and beliefs. The colourful Madhubani paintings of Bihar and the Kalighat paintings of Kolkata are relatively well-known, but in recent years it’s become harder to sustain India’s tribal art heritage. While the government has launched schemes and even cultural academies to promote tribal art, surviving on painting alone isn’t sustainable any more for the younger generations of these artists. Many are shifting to more commercially viable occupations, which could mark the end of age-old...

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Artist dreams her world through painting
Nov30

Artist dreams her world through painting

One evening when Sarah Kelly was in middle school, she decided to draw a picture of Hank Williams for a cousin who was a big fan of the country legend. At some point, she looked at the clock, expecting an hour to have passed. It was 4 a.m. “It was the first time I remember that I was in a zone,” Kelly said. “It was a realization that art was a meditation.”   Kelly grew up drawing, with the support of her mother, artist Cindy Taplin. But it wasn’t until that moment, deep into the night, that she decided to make art her life’s work. A 2007 graduate of West Forsyth High School, Kelly later earned a bachelor’s degree in painting and religious studies from Guilford College. Upon graduation, she moved to Santa Fe, N.M., without knowing anyone, eventually finding work with sculptor Kevin Box. She moved back to Winston-Salem a few years ago, becoming active in the local arts scene, working to promote other artists and selling her art at fairs and pop-up shows. Kelly is director of the gift shop at Sawtooth School for Visual Art, choosing and marketing all the art that is for sale in the shop. Kelly is a versatile artist, who is a trained oil painter but dreams of being a full-time potter. She also makes jewellery and journals. Source:...

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Was Winslow Homer the Greatest American Painter of the 19th Century?
Nov29

Was Winslow Homer the Greatest American Painter of the 19th Century?

Winslow Homer occupies a prized place in the pantheon of American artists, beloved for his bright watercolor landscapes and tempestuous seascapes, as well as his depictions of soldiers during the Civil War, portrayals of African-American laborers in Virginia during the Reconstruction era, and his early illustrations of everyday New England life for Harper’s Weekly. Indeed some regard him as the greatest American painter of the 19th century, as Met curator H. Barbara Weinberg noted in the Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History. But does he deserve this accolade, in a century that also saw the development of the epic Hudson River School painters? As neither a teacher nor a member of a defined artistic group, Homer doesn’t categorize easily. But his art remains enormously popular, and he has long been regarded as one of America’s early artist icons. “The late 19th century was historically seen as being dominated by six artists,” Katherine Manthorne, a professor of American art at the CUNY Graduate Center told me via email, “the so-called ‘national’ triumvirate of Homer, Thomas Eakins, and Albert Pinkham Ryder, who spent most of their time at home…and the ‘internationals’ John Singer Sargent, James Abbott McNeill Whistler, and Mary Cassatt, who were largely expats.”Six artists, each talented and renowned enough to merit inclusion in the country’s top tier of 19th-century painters—so what’s so special, and quintessentially American, about Winslow Homer?   Source:...

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