Trump protest paintings part of art exhibition in Lake Worth
Jun06

Trump protest paintings part of art exhibition in Lake Worth

That’s what Maxine Schreiber, a lifelong artist always loved painting. A Palm Beach sunrise. A parakeet in a hibiscus tree. An historic Key West home. But for Schreiber, 72, things changed dramatically Nov. 8 when Donald Trump was elected president. The impact on Schreiber — and her work — was profound. “I felt very deflated and depressed,” said Schreiber, a political activist since she was a freshman at Emerson College in Boston when John F. Kennedy was assassinated. “I didn’t even feel like painting any more. Having someone like that representing America is like a nightmare.” So, she stopped painting for a little while. Then Schreiber got re-energized while watching and participating in local protests against the nation’s newly elected commander-in-chief. Schreiber found a new purpose and started painting those rallies. “I usually don’t paint people,” she said. “But I felt so inspired. It was more important to paint protesters than paint pretty landscapes. Why would I just paint beauty? There are more important things to be expressing right now.” Those paintings will be part of “Bread & Roses: Women Who Resist,” an exhibition Aug. 18-30 at the Clay Glass Metal Stone Gallery in Lake Worth. Joyce Brown, the gallery’s curator, said Schreiber’s work will be a big part of the show, which will include the works of more than 20 artists. Source: Palm Beach...

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Liverpool celebrates The Beatles’ Sgt Pepper album 
Jun02

Liverpool celebrates The Beatles’ Sgt Pepper album 

For the 50th anniversary of The Beatles’s Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band album, the city of Liverpool has commissioned 13 new works, including public art, concerts, theatre and dance performances—each inspired by a song from the album.  Among the pieces unveiled in the city on Thursday, 1 June are a 12-metre-high psychedelic mural by the US artist Judy Chicago, a series of public billboards by the British artist Jeremy Deller. Chicago says that although she was never a particularly big Beatles fan—“I’m not the groupie type. I was in my studio”—they represented “hope and change” to her. She was assigned the song Fixing a Hole as the starting point for her commission and after researching the various theories of the song’s meaning, from drug use to a hole in Paul McCartney’s new roof, she alighted on the idea of “fixing a hole in history—who gets to participate in it”. As an artist who has fought over much of her career to highlight the role of women in art history, Chicago says she “related to that”. Source: The Art...

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Uproar over artist’s painting of God as a black woman
May31

Uproar over artist’s painting of God as a black woman

Those critics have decried Rosales’ artwork as a “disgrace,” “disgusting” and “cultural appropriation.” The uproar over this particular interpretation of “The Creation of God” is odd: Literally thousands of versions of the painting exist, from sincere homages to jokey parodies. “The Simpsons” has spoofed the iconic image at least five times, while “Arrested Development” used the work of art as a hilarious set piece, with its “Adam” clad in cutoff denim shorts. You can even buy a sticker or throw-pillow depicting the scene as re-created by 1990s cult cartoon characters Beavis and Butthead. Plus, “The Creation of God” is part of a long and very serious tradition of artists reinterpreting or remixing classic works of art in order to make a cultural, social or political statement. Andy Warhol combined religious and commercial iconography in his 60 versions of Da Vinci’s “The Last Supper.” Contemporary artist Sherrie Levine questions the idea of authorship by copying artists like photographer Walker Evans and Marcel Duchamp (who himself gave the “Mona Lisa” a mustache in the name of the Dada movement). Painter Kehinde Wiley has reimagined several aggrandizing European portraits — such as one of Napoleon on a horse — by replacing their white protagonists with urban black youths. So, what makes Rosales’ black Goddess so offensive to these detractors? Source: New York...

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David Hockney’s sketch for famous swimming pool portrait expected to fetch £150,000 at auction
May22

David Hockney’s sketch for famous swimming pool portrait expected to fetch £150,000 at auction

The 1972 drawing, produced by Hockney as a working study for his Portrait Of An Artist (Pool With Two Figures), is coming to auction at Sotheby’s in London next month where it is predicted to fetch £150,000. He sketched the image, which is signed and marked Saint Tropez, during an intensive burst of work after splitting up with his boyfriend Peter Schlesinger, who is shown standing over the pool.Frances Christie, head of the auction house’s Modern British department, said its “intimate” appeal would attract collectors. She said: “It is just larger than a piece of A4 paper and you can see how with just a few strokes he does so much.” The completed canvas is one of the centrepieces of the Tate’s exhibition. It is the most extensive retrospective of Hockney’s work ever staged and Tate Britain director Alex Farquharson said they were anticipating it would be “one of the most visited exhibitions in the Tate’s history”. Source: London Evening...

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Sharon Sayegh Featured at The Ebba Osborne Memorial Award Exhibition
May16

Sharon Sayegh Featured at The Ebba Osborne Memorial Award Exhibition

NJ native, and long-time resident, Sayegh earned her B.A. at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. She later studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of Art (its earlier name), also in Philadelphia. Sayegh sites mentor Neil Welliver, and teachers Dorothy Yung, and Marcel Franquelin, as having significant impact on her artistic development. Sayegh shows her work nationally and is an award winning artist, including The Hunterdon Art Museum Prize. Her work is in The Permanent Art Collection, South Texas College, McAllen, TX. It has also appeared in several publications, the most recent will be in the Minetta Review, Spring 2017, the literary and art magazine of New York University. Inside the gallery, the Art Alliance will present recent works juried by Sayegh, under two different themes, Symbols and Backyard. This exhibition is open to members and non-members and is the final exhibition for the season. Source:...

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A Passionate Experimentalist, Painter Phillip J. Hampton 
May16

A Passionate Experimentalist, Painter Phillip J. Hampton 

Born in Kansas City, Mo., Hampton was a 30-year-old Army veteran and commercial artist with the Kansas City Call, a weekly black newspaper, when he earned his MFA. The year he graduated, he began teaching at Savannah State College (now University) in Georgia, and played an instrumental role in developing the school’s art and design program and expanding its facilities. He relocated to Southern Illinois University in Edwardsville, Ill. (SIUE), in 1969. There, he taught printmaking, design, and painting, and participated in the wider academic community, curating exhibitions, leading workshops, giving lectures and writing articles. A painter who worked in abstraction and professor emeritus at SIUE, Hampton died Dec. 17, 2016. In the months since, a fully illustrated digital volume about his life and work has been published and some of his paintings appeared in an African American fine art sale at Ripley Auctions of Indianapolis, Ind., on March 18. His obituary, published in the Edwardsville Intelligencer in Illinois, cites his evolving painting style and approach to his work: “Although Hampton’s early works were characterized by an interest in perception and the realities and aesthetics of the world around him, a shift began to take place in the 1960s when he began to investigate abstraction. …He found abstraction to be infinitely satisfying because it allowed him to break free of representational constraints. With abstraction, he could address philosophical concerns without being bound to specific narratives or didactic ideas.” Source: Culture...

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