David Hockney’s sketch for famous swimming pool portrait expected to fetch £150,000 at auction
May22

David Hockney’s sketch for famous swimming pool portrait expected to fetch £150,000 at auction

The 1972 drawing, produced by Hockney as a working study for his Portrait Of An Artist (Pool With Two Figures), is coming to auction at Sotheby’s in London next month where it is predicted to fetch £150,000. He sketched the image, which is signed and marked Saint Tropez, during an intensive burst of work after splitting up with his boyfriend Peter Schlesinger, who is shown standing over the pool.Frances Christie, head of the auction house’s Modern British department, said its “intimate” appeal would attract collectors. She said: “It is just larger than a piece of A4 paper and you can see how with just a few strokes he does so much.” The completed canvas is one of the centrepieces of the Tate’s exhibition. It is the most extensive retrospective of Hockney’s work ever staged and Tate Britain director Alex Farquharson said they were anticipating it would be “one of the most visited exhibitions in the Tate’s history”. Source: London Evening...

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Sharon Sayegh Featured at The Ebba Osborne Memorial Award Exhibition
May16

Sharon Sayegh Featured at The Ebba Osborne Memorial Award Exhibition

NJ native, and long-time resident, Sayegh earned her B.A. at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. She later studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of Art (its earlier name), also in Philadelphia. Sayegh sites mentor Neil Welliver, and teachers Dorothy Yung, and Marcel Franquelin, as having significant impact on her artistic development. Sayegh shows her work nationally and is an award winning artist, including The Hunterdon Art Museum Prize. Her work is in The Permanent Art Collection, South Texas College, McAllen, TX. It has also appeared in several publications, the most recent will be in the Minetta Review, Spring 2017, the literary and art magazine of New York University. Inside the gallery, the Art Alliance will present recent works juried by Sayegh, under two different themes, Symbols and Backyard. This exhibition is open to members and non-members and is the final exhibition for the season. Source:...

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A Passionate Experimentalist, Painter Phillip J. Hampton 
May16

A Passionate Experimentalist, Painter Phillip J. Hampton 

Born in Kansas City, Mo., Hampton was a 30-year-old Army veteran and commercial artist with the Kansas City Call, a weekly black newspaper, when he earned his MFA. The year he graduated, he began teaching at Savannah State College (now University) in Georgia, and played an instrumental role in developing the school’s art and design program and expanding its facilities. He relocated to Southern Illinois University in Edwardsville, Ill. (SIUE), in 1969. There, he taught printmaking, design, and painting, and participated in the wider academic community, curating exhibitions, leading workshops, giving lectures and writing articles. A painter who worked in abstraction and professor emeritus at SIUE, Hampton died Dec. 17, 2016. In the months since, a fully illustrated digital volume about his life and work has been published and some of his paintings appeared in an African American fine art sale at Ripley Auctions of Indianapolis, Ind., on March 18. His obituary, published in the Edwardsville Intelligencer in Illinois, cites his evolving painting style and approach to his work: “Although Hampton’s early works were characterized by an interest in perception and the realities and aesthetics of the world around him, a shift began to take place in the 1960s when he began to investigate abstraction. …He found abstraction to be infinitely satisfying because it allowed him to break free of representational constraints. With abstraction, he could address philosophical concerns without being bound to specific narratives or didactic ideas.” Source: Culture...

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Chicano Art Wields A Sharper Political Edge
May15

Chicano Art Wields A Sharper Political Edge

Chicano art never really went out of style in California; it was born during the political foment of the 1960s and ’70s, and it’s bubbled along since then for decades. Now there’s a new wave of the genre, one that’s taken on a fiercer political edge since November. In LA, for example, there’s a group show opening called “Art As Resistance: Paintings in Protest to a Trump Presidency.” It’s the brainchild of Eric Almanza, a figurative painter and high school art teacher. Almanza’s contribution to the show is the latest in a series of oil paintings he’s produced depicting the border wall with Mexico. It shows the wall on fire and graffitied with the words “f – – – your wall” next to a curious symbol: a circular dream catcher with a triangle in the center that looks a bit like the “Triforce” from the Japanese video game series Legend of Zelda. “Because every great resistance needs some kind of logo,” Almanza says. He calls the painting With This Fire, a Rebellion Will Rise. Almanza is one of a growing number of Chicano artists responding to Trump administration efforts to peel back civil rights enforcement and crack down on illegal immigration, with a heavy emphasis on Latino immigration. “About four years ago, I started working on this narrative of this post-apocalyptic, 21st century society,” Almanza says. “I always imagined it would take place 50 years from now, but it almost seems like time has fast-forwarded.” Source:...

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An artist the left would love to forget
Apr28

An artist the left would love to forget

  Jon McNaughton has been a “hidden man” in many respects. A conservative painter with extensive knowledge of his craft, he was far from being a household name – until Sean Hannity introduced him to America in 2012. Sean and Jon intersected through a link in the Drudge Report. It noted that images of his painting, “The Forgotten Man,” had racked up millions of hits. Hannity seemed enthralled with the bold, outrageously populist sentiments of the piece, and he also appreciated it as a work of art.   Six feet across, “The Forgotten Man” is a visual show-down between President Obama and past U.S. presidents. In roughly chronological order, the massed presidents witness Obama defiantly standing on the Constitution. Naughton adds touches of history and political commentary in his portrayal of presidents past. Some are disturbed, others stolidly stare. Clinton, FDR and Teddy Roosevelt are applauding. To the left, a melancholy man sits dejectedly, ignoring the gesturing crowd. This is McNaughton’s “Forgotten Man” or 21st century Everyman. It was the first time he used Obama as a central subject. “I was inspired to do this after they first passed the Obamaicare in 2010,” he explained. Source: An artist the left would love to...

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An Artist Repeatedly Imprints Her Body on Paper
Apr20

An Artist Repeatedly Imprints Her Body on Paper

The Brooklyn-based painter Keltie Ferris is known for her spray-painted, layered, and pixelated abstract paintings. She recently shifted away from this style to focus on her body prints, which are currently on view at Mitchell-Innes & Nash in an exhibition titled M\A\R\C\H. In these works she literally covers herself in oil and pigment and lies on top of a human-sized sheet of paper. Depending on the print, the designs either obscure or highlight the artist’s gender. “I’ve always been looking for some sort of extremely indexical ‘I am here’ mark to put into my paintings,” she said. Ferris and I discussed her work in M\A\R\C\H and how she used her body not only as a tool, but to political effect by building an army of bodies. Source: An Artist Repeatedly Imprints Her Body on...

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