Jim Cantrell First KY Artist Selected To Create Official ‘Art Of The Kentucky Derby’
Dec15

Jim Cantrell First KY Artist Selected To Create Official ‘Art Of The Kentucky Derby’

Churchill Downs today released the 2017 “Official Art of the Kentucky Derby” by award-winning American and Kentucky painter Jim Cantrell. Cantrell is the first Kentucky artist to create the Derby’s officially licensed artwork since the tradition began in 1997. For this year’s artwork, Cantrell created watercolor paintings that capture the excitement and color of the 143rd running of each the Kentucky Derby presented by Yum! Brands and the Longines Kentucky Oaks. Cantrell’s “Official Art of the Kentucky Derby” will be featured on the 2017 Kentucky Derby and Kentucky Oaks posters, tickets and souvenir racing programs. The posters and a variety of merchandise including ornaments, t-shirts, bags, post cards and invitations are available now at select retail outlets, including the Kentucky Derby Museum. Source: ‘Art Of The Kentucky...

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Why Kandinsky chose to make abstract art
Dec05

Why Kandinsky chose to make abstract art

With his abstract forms and bold colors, Wassily Kandinsky was a revolutionary. Hated by the Nazis, he not only painted, but taught other artists to think outside the box. He was born 150 years ago on December 4. In 1910, Russian artist Wassily Kandinsky painted his first abstract watercolor. The following year, he presented his works in an exhibition held by the Neue Künstlervereinigung München, or Munich New Artists’ Association. It turned out to be a scandal. “Either the majority of the members in this association are incurably insane or we’re dealing with a group of unscrupulous con men that very well know how to sensationalize the weaknesses of our contemporaries and try to take advantage of the large demand,” commented the newspaper “Münchener Neuste Nachrichten.” For Europe’s avant-garde, Kandinsky’s abstract art was revolutionary. Source:...

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Bob Dylan: a Hockney-like painter of America’s strange essence
Nov09

Bob Dylan: a Hockney-like painter of America’s strange essence

Long before Bob Dylan was awarded the Nobel prize in literature, pundits used to talk about “Dylan versus Keats”, as if you had to choose, and as if Dylan’s poetic transformations of folk song are really so different from what John Keats does in his eerie ballad La Belle Dame sans Merci. When it comes to Dylan’s art, the dice fall differently. Dylan versus John Constable would make no sense, for when it comes to drawing and painting it’s as plain as a Brooklyn ice cream parlour that Bob Dylan is a bluff old traditionalist. He draws and paints what he sees, although in his latest, impressive show at London’s Halcyon Gallery you feel that what he sees is always subtly merging with an America in his mind. Sometimes that inner America seeps out. A crowd of midwesterners gawping at a fairground sideshow that offers a peep into a “Harem” – surely this has come from Dylan’s dreams? Yet most of the time, with true observation and patient work, he records reality in all its strangeness. Source: Bob Dylan: a Hockney-like painter of America’s strange essence | Art and design | The...

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It only took 200 years: Prado stages its first show dedicated to a female artist
Oct26

It only took 200 years: Prado stages its first show dedicated to a female artist

The 200-year-old Museo del Prado in Madrid unveiled its first exhibition dedicated to a female artist today, 25 October (until 19 February 2017). The Art of Clara Peeters, which travels from the Royal Museum of Fine Arts in Antwerp, is a display of 15 still-lifes by one of the few women to work as a professional painter in 17th-century Europe. The Flemish artist is among just 41 women to be represented in the Spanish museum’s permanent collection (compared with more than 5,000 men). The modest one-room show reflects a slender, scantily documented oeuvre. Born in the late 1580s in Antwerp, Clara Peeters was a contemporary of the Jan Brueghel the Elder, Peter Paul Rubens and Anthony van Dyck. She is named by a number of historical accounts as a painter based in Antwerp, though she was not a member of the city’s official guild. Only 11 of the 39 works attributed to Peeters are dated, the earliest of them to 1607 and the latest to 1621. She was, however, a pioneer of the still-life genre—the first artist to depict fish and hunting game as a main subject, according to the Prado—who sold her paintings through dealers to collections in Rotterdam, Amsterdam and Madrid. Read full article at source: It only took 200 years: Prado stages its first show dedicated to a female...

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The Son of Man, 1946 by Rene Magritte
Oct14

The Son of Man, 1946 by Rene Magritte

Magritte painted The Son of Man as a self-portrait. The painting consists of a man in an overcoat and a bowler hat standing in front of a short wall, beyond which is the sea and a cloudy sky. The man’s face is largely obscured by a hovering green apple. However, the man’s eyes can be seen peeking over the edge of the apple. Another subtle feature is that the man’s left arm appears to bend backwards at the elbow. About the painting, Magritte said:”At least it hides the face partly. Well, so you have the apparent face, the apple, hiding the visible but hidden, the face of the person. It’s something that happens constantly. Everything we see hides another thing, we always want to see what is hidden by what we see. There is an interest in that which is hidden and which the visible does not show us. This interest can take the form of a quite intense feeling, a sort of conflict, one might say, between the visible that is hidden and the visible that is present.” The Son of Man resembles The Great War on Facades (La Grande Guerre Facades), another Magritte painting featuring similar imagery. Both feature a person standing in front of a wall overlooking the sea. The Great War on Facades, however, features a woman holding an umbrella, her face covered by a flower. There is also Man in the Bowler Hat, a similar painting where the man’s face is obscured by a bird rather than an apple. Source: The Son of Man, 1946 by Rene...

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