Carroll Davis brushes aside the conventional for a life of art
Apr04

Carroll Davis brushes aside the conventional for a life of art

At 87 years old, Carroll Davis is still a work in progress, as he continues to pursue his life’s love and passion of art – and even more so today, having overcome a double pulmonary embolism and cheating death in the process. Perhaps what is keeping him so prolific in his work is that he maintains an incredibly rigorous routine for a man of his years, making the best of life in his studio inside his apartment home in East Ridge at Cutler Bay where he currently resides with his wife, Jacqueline. Yet after all these years and having lived in so many exotic spots around the globe, Davis recounts that life-changing moment for him when his parents, unsupportive of his dreams and aspirations, wanted him to pursue a law career and put aside his love of painting and art. Carroll Davis and wife Jacqueline. His father was a hard-nosed businessman raised the hard way, born in 1880 Texas. Founder of the nationwide auto parts chain Western Auto (remember Davis Tires?), Davis credits his dad with making a fortune and being a man of the world, yet he could not bring himself to support his son’s aspirations as an artist. Nonetheless, the young Davis persisted. Today, he believes “The more recognition you can achieve, the better.” One of the most recent paintings, from his China series, sold to a wealthy South American collector. He is also proud of the painting he sold to Chase Manhattan Bank years back which remains in their permanent collection. Through exposure here in Miami, he hopes his art will continue to be displayed around the world.   Full article at: Community...

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There’s a poetry in painting that gives endless possibilities
Mar21

There’s a poetry in painting that gives endless possibilities

It was always my dream to be an artist but I never expected to be a curator. Graduates considering vocations in critical and curatorial practice went to the Royal College of Art or studied art history at university. Not me: I trained at Chelsea College of Art and then went to the British School at Rome where I was the Abbey Scholar in Painting. In general I like to work with painters – there’s a poetry in painting that gives endless possibilities and painting is often about looking inward – searching the “space within”. Silent Painting is the sixth show I have curated, featuring three women artists at an exciting new space in King’s Cross, the Tripp Gallery. The idea for the exhibition came when I stumbled across a painting I had not seen since I was a student. I was wandering around the National Gallery when I spotted Rembrandt’s Self Portrait, 1669, made at the end of his life when he was 63 years old. It’s quite a sad painting – the darkness of the work reflects the old man’s mood as he contemplates his own demise and it seems he has nothing left to say. The painting I have selected for this show from my own work is The Perfect 50s Housewife, 2018 (main picture). It tells the story of the American housewife from a bygone era, who has bought a new fridge and stuffed it with food and drink. Her daughter stands there showing off her huge homemade cake whilst the mother mimes “Isn’t it big!”. The fashionable scenes displayed in my work are populated but focus on the non-communication or separation of each figure from the other, creating a void of silence. Source: The Art...

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The Cosmic Landscapes of Matthew Lee
Feb13

The Cosmic Landscapes of Matthew Lee

Matthew Lee is a phenomenal landscape painter, with the ability to absorb you into the world of his paintings. His work makes you want to spend time with it and ponder the message behind it. He grew up in Middleton, west of Madison, journeyed to Milwaukee when he was 18 years old, and never looked back. After receiving his bachelor’s degree in portrait painting from UW-Milwaukee, he went on a research adventure to Antarctica that would change his style and focus of painting, drawing from him the works that are currently wowing viewers of his Redline Milwaukee exhibition. When he is not showing his work in galleries Lee teaches art classes at MIAD and makes annual trips, with Carthage college, to Montana to excavate 65-million-year-old dinosaur remains. In all of his works you can see his appreciation for our earth and the amount of time and energy he has put into mastering the visual representation of it on canvas. I had the pleasure of sitting with Matt for an enlightening discussion. What is your favorite type of Art? I like early American Modernism, a lot. Peter Bloom, Edward Hopper, and those people. I always joke that my work is like Ed Hopper’s Antarctica, like if he had decided to get out of New England, if he had been to the Arctic and been around telescopes and painted like that.   Read full article at source:...

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If the West can appreciate India’s tribal art, why can’t Indians?
Jan25

If the West can appreciate India’s tribal art, why can’t Indians?

The paintings of iconic Indian artists such as MF Husain and VS Gaitonde may raise millions of dollars at global auctions, but there’s a whole world of tribal talent that remains largely unknown, even within India. To change this, an upcoming online platform is putting these unsung artists front and centre, highlighting the unique paintings of the Gonds from Madhya Pradesh and the Warli in Maharashtra, among others. Tribal Art Forms, a collaboration between the contemporary art galleries Exhibit320 and BluePrint12, aims to raise awareness about India’s diverse tribal art forms, and give its master artists the recognition they deserve. “…when you travel abroad, you realise a lot of this art is really appreciated abroad. They understand the value and that it’s not going to be here to stay for a very long time,” Rasika Kajaria, owner and chief operating officer of Exhibit320, told Quartz. “And in India the value is not understood. It seems to most that it’s here, it’s available, but the point is it’s not anymore, and the number of people making it is reducing every single day.” For decades, India’s tribal communities have been creating unique paintings, featuring animal figures and nature-based themes, which document their distinct cultures and beliefs. The colourful Madhubani paintings of Bihar and the Kalighat paintings of Kolkata are relatively well-known, but in recent years it’s become harder to sustain India’s tribal art heritage. While the government has launched schemes and even cultural academies to promote tribal art, surviving on painting alone isn’t sustainable any more for the younger generations of these artists. Many are shifting to more commercially viable occupations, which could mark the end of age-old...

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Artist dreams her world through painting
Nov30

Artist dreams her world through painting

One evening when Sarah Kelly was in middle school, she decided to draw a picture of Hank Williams for a cousin who was a big fan of the country legend. At some point, she looked at the clock, expecting an hour to have passed. It was 4 a.m. “It was the first time I remember that I was in a zone,” Kelly said. “It was a realization that art was a meditation.”   Kelly grew up drawing, with the support of her mother, artist Cindy Taplin. But it wasn’t until that moment, deep into the night, that she decided to make art her life’s work. A 2007 graduate of West Forsyth High School, Kelly later earned a bachelor’s degree in painting and religious studies from Guilford College. Upon graduation, she moved to Santa Fe, N.M., without knowing anyone, eventually finding work with sculptor Kevin Box. She moved back to Winston-Salem a few years ago, becoming active in the local arts scene, working to promote other artists and selling her art at fairs and pop-up shows. Kelly is director of the gift shop at Sawtooth School for Visual Art, choosing and marketing all the art that is for sale in the shop. Kelly is a versatile artist, who is a trained oil painter but dreams of being a full-time potter. She also makes jewellery and journals. Source:...

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