Lisa Yuskavage’s Sultry Sirens Are Back
Jun16

Lisa Yuskavage’s Sultry Sirens Are Back

In what is her debut outing at David Zwirner‘s London venue, Lisa Yuskavage presents a survey of new paintings depicting the erotic yet angelic women that she has become so well known for. Here, her noticeable subjects—whose full busts and hour-glass shapes render them close to caricatures—return in full form, depicted across a series of 14 works. Particularly voluptuous women are somewhat of a signature motif for the painter, and Yuskavage has long succeeded in imbuing them with contradicting characteristics: they are at once human—their bodies playing a central role in the works—while simultaneously being other-worldly and dreamlike. Some of this complicated aura can be attributed to the two starkly different realms the artist alternates between: the domestic and the fantastic. The household settings provides the women with a human quality, while the juxtaposing ethereal background reminds us that they possess celestial, seraphic qualities. These starkly different backdrops both serve to underscore the women’s heavily exaggerated sexuality. A handful of the works on view at Zwirner depict the female protagonist engaging with a man or men, further complicating Yuskavage’s characters in a move the press release explains as an “exploration of the dynamics of intertwined couples.” All of these multi-figure paintings are sexual in nature, regardless of whether the subjects are shown mid-act or bathing in post-coital bliss. Source:  artnet...

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Greenwich painter learned well from the Old Masters
Jun12

Greenwich painter learned well from the Old Masters

Peter Layne Arguimbau smears a dab of iron oxide on a strip of wood with a palette knife. “Look at it,” he says. “It’s a beautiful tonal sepia soup.” He mixes in a bit of powdered light-blue pigment and meshes the two substances together with his fingers. Suddenly, as if he were an alchemist, he achieves a fierce blue color with tremendous depth. He picks up one of his paintings, of a young woman with luxurious dark, wavy hair that seems to glisten in the light. “This is the same blue,” he says, pointing to the center of a mass of hair. It looks black to me.   A nationally recognized artist of marine paintings, Arguimbau is so much more than the simple biography of him that has appeared in numerous publications and gallery press releases over the years. His seascapes of yachts are much prized by collectors, but less known is his other work: woodlands, still life, portraiture, animals and religious subjects. All of his oil paintings glisten with luminosity and translucence. He is also a consummate artist, from mixing pigments with oxides in the manner of the Flemish masters to painting his seascapes from the cockpit of his catboat, the Molly Rose. He creates iron, zinc, sulfate and magnesium oxides to meld with only a handful of powdered pigments to achieve incredible nuances of color. This is only part of his story. Source: Connecticut...

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The woman who brought modern art to Los Angeles
Jun09

The woman who brought modern art to Los Angeles

The jackdaw is one of the smartest birds around. In folklore, she is very acquisitive, picking up bright, beautiful, shiny things with which to line her nest. She is, in short, your basic avian art collector. In 1915, painter Alexei Jawlensky nick-named aspiring young artist Emilie Esther Scheyer “Galka,” Russian for “jackdaw.”  This was the name she wore for the rest of her life. Like her namesake, she was brilliant and spent her life surrounding herself with beautiful things—as well as the people who made them. Head in Profile, 1919; Emil Nolde (German, 1867-1956); Watercolor and India ink on tan wove paperNORTON SIMON MUSEUM, THE BLUE FOUR GALKA SCHEYER COLLECTION The Norton-Simon’s current show, “Maven of Modernism: Galka Scheyer in California,” includes about 100 works from some 500 in her personal collection. They range from pieces by Lyonel Feininger to Edward Weston, but the heart of the show is the assemblage of pictures by the quartet she called “The Blue Four,” of whom Jawlensky was the first: then came Feininger, Paul Klee, and Vasily Kandinsky. Heavy Circles, 1927; Vasily Kandinsky (Russian, 1866-1944); Oil on canvas. NORTON SIMON MUSEUM, THE BLUE FOUR GALKA SCHEYER COLLECTION Galka  gave up her own artistic ambitions to present, promote and sell their work. In 1924, she came to California as a prophet of the Blue Four avant garde, first in San Francisco, whose taste she found to be too conservative, then in Los Angeles, where she remained for the rest of her life.  She lectured on, promoted, and publicized modern art as she socialized with celebrities like Joseph von Sternberg, John Cage, and Richard Neutra, who designed her house/gallery in Hollywood Hills. There she extended her collection to include another 44 painters and photographers. By the time of her 1946 death, she had acquired the best collection of modern art in the West—including Picasso, Nolde, Moholy-Nagy, Franz Marc, and Diego Rivera. By bringing so much great modern work to Los Angeles so early, she is credited with helping to make it the international art center it is today. Source: 89.3...

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How Hilton Head Island was an ‘enormous gift’ for painter Joseph Orr
Jun09

How Hilton Head Island was an ‘enormous gift’ for painter Joseph Orr

The paintings of Joseph Orr will be featured at Red Piano Art Gallery this month in a celebration of the artist’s more than 20-year relationship with the gallery. “We were a much smaller gallery up on Orleans Road when we first saw the work of Joseph Orr,” said Ben Whiteside, owner with his wife, Lyn, of the gallery. “A kind of odd-looking, generic package arrived by mail, filled with small artworks, mostly landscapes, all by some artist named Joseph Orr. They were just outstanding, but we had no idea who he was or how in the world these paintings ended up at our gallery.” Whiteside said he reached out to Orr, then living in Missouri, and after a few minutes of nonstop conversation, had developed a plan in which Orr would provide additional paintings and visit the Lowcountry to meet the folks at Red Piano. And discover Hilton Head. “As an artist, a painter of landscapes, arriving on Hilton Head Island was just an enormous gift,” said Orr. “Everything about the setting thrilled me, and I was ready to take in this amazing Lowcountry first hand.” There are close to a dozen Orr pieces hanging throughout the Red Piano. His richly imagined and dramatically portrayed landscapes are done on canvas or Masonite and created in his medium of choice, acrylic. My favorite piece is “In Front of the Sunset.” Consider the movement Orr communicates through his portrayal of the subtle motion captured in the waterway, the ripples in the water, the motion of the seagrasses and the reflection of the sun on the water. Source: Island...

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Trump protest paintings part of art exhibition in Lake Worth
Jun06

Trump protest paintings part of art exhibition in Lake Worth

That’s what Maxine Schreiber, a lifelong artist always loved painting. A Palm Beach sunrise. A parakeet in a hibiscus tree. An historic Key West home. But for Schreiber, 72, things changed dramatically Nov. 8 when Donald Trump was elected president. The impact on Schreiber — and her work — was profound. “I felt very deflated and depressed,” said Schreiber, a political activist since she was a freshman at Emerson College in Boston when John F. Kennedy was assassinated. “I didn’t even feel like painting any more. Having someone like that representing America is like a nightmare.” So, she stopped painting for a little while. Then Schreiber got re-energized while watching and participating in local protests against the nation’s newly elected commander-in-chief. Schreiber found a new purpose and started painting those rallies. “I usually don’t paint people,” she said. “But I felt so inspired. It was more important to paint protesters than paint pretty landscapes. Why would I just paint beauty? There are more important things to be expressing right now.” Those paintings will be part of “Bread & Roses: Women Who Resist,” an exhibition Aug. 18-30 at the Clay Glass Metal Stone Gallery in Lake Worth. Joyce Brown, the gallery’s curator, said Schreiber’s work will be a big part of the show, which will include the works of more than 20 artists. Source: Palm Beach...

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