An Artist Repeatedly Imprints Her Body on Paper
Apr20

An Artist Repeatedly Imprints Her Body on Paper

The Brooklyn-based painter Keltie Ferris is known for her spray-painted, layered, and pixelated abstract paintings. She recently shifted away from this style to focus on her body prints, which are currently on view at Mitchell-Innes & Nash in an exhibition titled M\A\R\C\H. In these works she literally covers herself in oil and pigment and lies on top of a human-sized sheet of paper. Depending on the print, the designs either obscure or highlight the artist’s gender. “I’ve always been looking for some sort of extremely indexical ‘I am here’ mark to put into my paintings,” she said. Ferris and I discussed her work in M\A\R\C\H and how she used her body not only as a tool, but to political effect by building an army of bodies. Source: An Artist Repeatedly Imprints Her Body on...

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Soriano Soars to the Highest Reaches of Heaven
Apr18

Soriano Soars to the Highest Reaches of Heaven

The Association of Art Museum Directors (AAMD)* says that attendance at AAMD museums was over 60 million in 2015. Furthermore, according to the U.S. Travel Association, “76 percent of all U.S. leisure travelers participate in cultural or heritage activities such as visiting museums.” Long Beach Museum of Art (LBMA) is the top rated traditional museum in the area, according to TripAdvisor, just falling behind the Queen Mary for any museum-type institutions in the area. Located just a few minutes from the Long Beach airport, the Long Beach Museum of Art is only a 30-minute drive from either LAX or John Wayne Airport (SNA). Long Beach Museum of Art was founded in 1950 as a municipal art center, and is located in the historic 1911 Elizabeth Milbank Anderson House. In 2000, the Museum restored the residence and constructed a new two-story exhibition pavilion. Since then, the Museum has offered diverse and compelling exhibitions, which has resulted in increased visitors and program attendance.   Source:...

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Queer British Art 1861-1967 at Tate Britain
Apr04

Queer British Art 1861-1967 at Tate Britain

Employing this current buzz-term with ostentatious bluntness, the title of this substantial show celebrating fifty years since the “partial decriminalisation” of male homosexuality in 1967’s Sexual Offences act, begs the question of whether we’re in for art that tells the story of homosexuality in Britain over the 150 years leading up to the legal landmark, or art by artists who just happen to be gay. Judging by the first room, devoted to the late 19th century Aesthetic Movement, the exhibition might have been better titled Screamingly Camp Art. Victorian academic sculptor Hamo Thornycroft provides a piece of slack-trousered soft porn in his magnificently muscled male figure The Mower, while Evelyn de Morgan’s Aurora Triumphans, a preposterous essay in androgynous Pre-Raphaelitism, may conceivably provide evidence that the artist was having an affair with her maid, as the curators suggest. Source: Queer British Art 1861-1967 at Tate...

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